May 18, 2022

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Cooking is a hobby

4 Concealed Gem Food stuff Halls All over DC

Spice Village. Photograph courtesy of Spice Village.

Photograph of The Block courtesy of Jeff Elkins

1110 Vermont Ave., NW 967 Rose Ave., North Bethesda

Area meals-corridor pioneer Arturo Mei has installed miniature versions of his pan-Asian Annandale food stuff corridor in each downtown DC and North Bethesda’s Pike & Rose.

On the menu: Suitable now, there are only a few possibilities at each. In DC, head to Pogiboy for smash burgers and Filipino consolation food and to Rose Ave Bakery for breakfast pastries. At Pike & Rose, Very little Miner Taco serves stewy birria in ramen, a cheesesteak, and yes, tacos.

 

Photograph of Mix’t courtesy of Jeff Elkins

3809 Rhode Island Ave., Brentwood

Veteran chef Sandy Patterson took more than the foodstuff hall formerly identified as Savor at 3807 past calendar year. The mild, ethereal room features a great deal of space, furthermore an art gallery.

On the menu: The primary spot of Tiny Miner stays, as does the comfortable Relish Market place, the place you will discover freshly pressed juices and good housemade hot sauces. St. Crispy’s, the newcomer, does fried chicken and brunchy Sunday fare.

 

Photograph of Social Beast courtesy of Rey Lopez.

2340 Wisconsin Ave., NW

What was once a takeout-only food stuff corridor called Ghostline is now heading in a more convivial route. The Glover Park location has loads of outside seating, weekly jazz displays, and a bustling brunch scene.

On the menu: Go for Detroit pizza, significant sandwiches from chef Peter Smith, and tacos and queso from Mijita’s, a new Tex-Mex joint from longtime pastry chef Naomi Gallego.

 

Photograph courtesy of Spice Village.

2501 Centreville Rd., Herndon

This strip-shopping mall spot stands out for using halal meats across quite a few cuisines. The booth seating is comprehensive-services, and you order off 4 separate menus.

On the menu: What is not? Select amongst burgers and steaks, many fettuccine Alfredos, peri-peri rooster, and tacos—plus comprehensive Chinese and Indian lineups.

This write-up seems in the July 2021 difficulty of Washingtonian.

Ann Limpert

Executive Foods Editor/Critic

Ann Limpert joined Washingtonian in late 2003. She was earlier an editorial assistant at Amusement Weekly and a prepare dinner in New York restaurant kitchens, and she is a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Training. She life in Logan Circle.

Foods Editor

Anna Spiegel addresses the eating and ingesting scene in her native DC. Prior to joining Washingtonian in 2010, she attended the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University’s MFA software in New York, and held different cooking and writing positions in NYC and in St. John, US Virgin Islands.